(Source: halloweenhorrorsqueen)


1,384 notes | Reblog | 5 hours ago
wall-to-wall-shezza:

I’m so happy this picture exists

wall-to-wall-shezza:

I’m so happy this picture exists

(Source: vicieinatv)


18,579 notes | Reblog | 5 hours ago

kaywinnetleetam:

Jumping on a bandwagon, Part I (?)


18,152 notes | Reblog | 5 hours ago

jennyspring:

your smile is contagious (14/?)
- dylan o’brien


719 notes | Reblog | 5 hours ago

loubes:

it was a simpler time


7,942 notes | Reblog | 5 hours ago
scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

through 
Neurons want food

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

Neurons want food


5,297 notes | Reblog | 5 hours ago

izzydoodledump:

Alex, Clover, and Sam!


24,400 notes | Reblog | 7 hours ago

Since the spooky season is arriving

pocaloids:

• don’t do blackface for Halloween


320 notes | Reblog | 7 hours ago

chomei:

My father recently lost his job, we lost our house and now on top of this he has been diagnosed with cancer of the lymph nodes. 

He is a professional machinist and has been working as one for over 30 years, only to then have his work stolen from him by his own mother and sister.  We’ve been scraping by since then and now that he lost his job we have absolutely nothing to live off of.

He is such a strong person and until yesterday I have never once seen him cry.  We’re absolutely devastated - he has cancer and we have no way to help him.  

He has always refused to take money from other people and he has spent his life helping people in need, and now we are the ones who need help.

My mother’s best friend has made a gofundme to try and help us pay our bills (we currently have no income whatsoever) and get him the treatment he so desperately needs.  

If you can’t donate then (please, please, please) signal boost this.  I’ll also share with him any supportive asks I receive regarding this..

I love my father so much and I am so afraid to lose him right now.

GOFUNDME


9,001 notes | Reblog | 18 hours ago

I actually think episode 2 of The X-Files is my worse-case-scenario-medical-nightmare. 


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